Howard Delo

In an earlier column, we mentioned the newly released king salmon sport fishing regulations for the Valley and some of the regulations for the Kenai Peninsula. Many folks were unhappy, I’m sure, to learn that the best to be hoped for is catch and release fishing with no retention of salmon.

Some Valley anglers branch out to other areas of Alaska. If these folks decide to explore the Kodiak area in hopes of better conditions, they will be disappointed. In a news release dated Feb. 8, Fish and Game states, “To protect returning king salmon and ensure fishing opportunities in the future, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing sport fishing for king salmon in the Karluk River drainage including the lagoon and its outlet stream effective 12:01 a.m. Tuesday June 1, through 11:59 p.m. Sunday July 25, 2021.”

Continuing, “This closure prohibits sport fishing for king salmon including catch-and-release. During the closure, king salmon may not be targeted, possessed, or retained; king salmon that are caught incidentally while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. In addition, as a measure to reduce incidental hooking of king salmon, the use of bait is prohibited and only one unbaited, single-hook artificial lure may be used in the Karluk River drainage below Karluk Lake including the lagoon and its outlet stream.”

A second news release from the department, also dated Feb. 8, addresses the Ayakulik River, “To protect returning king salmon and ensure fishing opportunities in the future, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing sport fishing for king salmon in the Ayakulik River drainage effective 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, June 1, through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 25, 2021.”

The release goes on, “This closure prohibits sport fishing for king salmon, including catch-and-release. During the closure, king salmon may not be targeted, possessed, or retained; king salmon that are caught incidentally while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. In addition, as a measure to reduce incidental hooking of king salmon, the use of bait is prohibited and only one unbaited, single-hook artificial lure may be used in the Ayakulik River drainage.”

As you plan your summer fishing trips, get a copy of the current regulations booklet for the area you plan to fish and either go online or stop by a Fish and Game office and get copies of the news releases giving additional regulations for the area.

On another note, I spent both days this past weekend at the gun show sponsored by the Matanuska Valley Shooting facility, held at Raven Hall on the state fair grounds. I was helping man the Mount McKinley Mountainmen black powder club tables. The display items for this show included various styles of Sharps and Remington Rolling Block blackpowder cartridge rifles with the theme of the guns “that killed the bison.”

I enjoyed talking with folks walking by the tables, many of whom are friends. There were questions about the various Sharps rifles and about the blackpowder club as well. We sold a bunch of tomahawks the club sells. We joked that people were buying the ‘hawks to use at the new axe throwing business opening in Wasilla. Maybe there’s some truth to that, who knows?

Because of the pandemic and sequestering, folks were ready to get out. This show was the answer to the cabin fever. It was announced that more than 7,000 people passed through the doors for the two-day show. The place seemed busy for most of Saturday and tapered off into Sunday.

In an opinion column published in last Sunday’s Frontiersman, I wrote about some of the gun-grabbing legislation the Biden administration planned to push. Three major items of the Biden agenda were introduced in Congress earlier this week. The first would require universal background checks for all firearms sales. This will greatly delay gun sales because neither the BATFE nor the FBI have a large enough group of agents to handle the volume of sales in a timely manner. Maybe that’s the intent, to slow sales.

The second item would repeal the protection gun manufacturers currently enjoy from being held responsible for the unlawful use of their products by criminals. Try doing that for automobiles or alcoholic drinks!

The third item calls for banning manufacture of so-called assault weapons and large-capacity magazines. Knives are used to kill more people than all rifles combined. Do we ban knives next?

Load comments