Hatcher Pass

The Hatcher Pass Avalanche Center provides forecasts of the avalanche conditions in Hatcher Pass twice weekly during the winter and forecasts expire 24 hours after they are released.

PALMER — No new human-triggered avalanches have been observed in more than a week, but avalanche danger still persists in Hatcher Pass.

The Hatcher Pass Avalanche Center provides forecasts of the avalanche conditions in Hatcher Pass twice weekly during the winter and forecasts expire 24 hours after they are released. On Dec. 12, forecaster Jed Workman released an advisory listing moderate avalanche danger at mid to upper elevations and low avalanche danger for low elevations.

“Persistent slabs continue to be the primary avalanche problem and will be possible to human trigger on all aspects, at mid to upper elevations, on slopes 30° and steeper. Remote avalanches will be possible to human trigger. Natural avalanches are unlikely. Dry loose avalanches are possible to human trigger on all aspects and at all elevations on slopes 40° and steeper,” wrote Workman. “The risk of triggering any avalanche will be compounded due to shallow coverage in many locations. Even a small sluff could be traumatic, if swept into rocks, over cliffs, or into other shallowly buried hazards. This is reason enough to make conservative terrain choices. It’s a long winter, let’s stay in one piece!”

The last recorded avalanche is unclear as to whether it was human triggered or not, but HPAC also provides updates on the snow conditions on popular road runs such as “16 Mile” on their Instagram page @h_p_a_c. More information and observations can be found at https://hpavalanche.org/.

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